Pumpkin Wall 2016 By the Numbers

Pumpkin Wall 2016 By the Numbers

1: number of previous blog posts to check out before you read this one

  • 101: number of carved pumpkins on the wall
  • 10: number of shopping carts filled with purchased pumpkins
  • 1: number of UHaul trucks used to transport the pumpkins to my house
  • 1: number of trips to Walmart (made possible by the aforementioned UHaul)
  • 1: how many carving parties it took to carve all the pumpkins
  • 57: how many friends and neighbors helped carve
  • 126: number of carving tools used
  • 0: number of stab wounds and lost fingers while carving
  • 43: how many Halloween songs were played during the carving
  • 2: number of pinatas the kids got to play with
  • 4: how many sections of construction scaffolding supported the pumpkins
  • 6: number of feet tall the wall stood
  • 30: number of feet wide the wall stretched
  • 900: how many LED light bulbs illuminated the wall
  • 7: how many days the wall lasted before fruit flies took over
  • 1: how many local publications featured the wall on the front page (!!!)
  • 1,820: number of dollars raised in support of Food Allergy Research & Education
  • 50,724: how many seeds are in 101 pumpkins (just kidding, I made that one up)
  • 1,000,000,000: number of thanks to everyone who made this possible!!!

 

Aside

No Nut Butter Drive

I have been a member of the Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) Teen Advisory Group (TAG) for a few years, and this year I’ve had the privilege of being one of two Southeast regional TAG leaders.  Earlier this year, the FARE national programs director encouraged all regions to do a service project, so we in Southeast TAG decided to do food allergy friendly food drives in our cities and towns.  Here’s how the project I ran in my area went.
         Since I am allergic to peanuts and tree nuts, I decided to do a peanut butter alternative drive.  I set up some cardboard boxes advertising the drive and asked a variety of grocery stores to display them in the fronts of their stores.  Several larger grocery store chains that I approached declined to participate in my drive.  Other grocers such as Earth Fare and The Fresh Market declined to allow me to conduct the drive in their stores, but instead generously donated jars of nut free butters.  Local Charlotte NC grocer Healthy Home Market was willing to display my boxes in their three storefronts.  The boxes were left out for six weeks and they each accumulated donations from shoppers.  During the duration of the project, I worked with Parents of Allergic Kids (PAK), a local food allergy advocacy group, to publicize the food drive through PAK’s social media.  FARE also promoted my drive on the Charlotte FARE Walk for Food Allergy newsletter.  On walk day, October 22nd, I brought a collection box to the event and gathered even more donations.


         In all, I was able to collect 56 jars of nut free butters such as WOWBUTTER, SunButter, and I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butter.  Initially I had intended to donate the jars to local food banks in my area to benefit needy food allergic individuals.  However, the drive concluded just as Hurricane Matthew was pummeling the Southeastern United States, including my home state of North Carolina.  Urgent requests for assistance to the eastern part of NC started pouring in.  One of the leaders of PAK suggested that we send the donations to the affected areas and I agreed that this was a great idea.  We sent the jars to a food bank that was able to separate and clearly mark the donations as appropriate for people with food allergies (see this post to help – there is still a need to help people affected by the storm!)
         I presented my food drive project on behalf of Southeast TAG at the 2016 FARE Teen Summit in Milwaukee, WI on November 13th.  Thank you to all who helped to make the project a success!




Link

Food Drive for Hurricane Victims

Recently eastern North Carolina was hit by Hurricane Matthew and has since been experiencing extreme flooding and subsequently, food shortages.  This is making life especially difficult for food allergic people affected by the storm.  Please consider donating food allergy friendly products to these members of our food allergic community – click here to find out how you can get involved.  Thank you!

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Everything was Red

I recently came across a red velvet cake recipe that was easy and delicious (and photogenic), so I thought I would share it.  I also thought I’d share the cocoa powder I used in the recipe.  It can be tricky to find cocoa powder from a nut free facility, however, I discovered a brand called Guittard Chocolate Company, and have since sworn by their chocolate chips and cocoa powder.  I used the “Cocoa Rouge” unsweetened cocoa powder in the red velvet cake.  The chocolate is not only delicious, but it also comes in gorgeous packaging.  Apparently they also make chocolate bars, but I haven’t tried them (yet).  I’ve come across some of their products at stores like Whole Foods and World Market, and their products can also be ordered online.


Going Nuts over Nut Free Bakeries

Going Nuts over Nut Free Bakeries

Bakeries pose challenges for food allergic people.  Even if the delicious looking chocolate cupcake in the case doesn’t have nuts in it, the pastry next to it might be covered in peanuts.  Since most bakery items are premade in areas where nuts are also handled, I have abstained from eating at bakeries since my diagnosis at age six.  It’s much easier to find prepackaged items that are nut free, but I never encountered a bakery where I could eat everything until recently.

A couple years ago I heard about a nut free bakery in New York City called Eleni’s.  My family stopped by while we were vacationing in the city, and never wanted to leave.  It was such a magical feeling to know that I could eat anything in the bakery without worrying about my allergies.  I ate several cupcakes at the bakery and bought some to go.  Eleni’s also sells cookies at their only location in NYC’s Chelsea Market and the cookies are carried by other stores around the US (I have found them at stores like TJ Maxx and Marshalls).  The crispy cookies come in many different types (my favorite being the chocolate chip ones), and I always have a box of them on hand.  I have been to NYC a couple more times since, and I am always sure to pick up a few cupcakes.


I thought that if NYC had a nut free bakery, Washington DC might have one too.  It does- Dog Tag Bakery is a nut free bakery located in Georgetown that benefits veterans by giving them work experience and guidance.  The bakery has a case full of delicious fresh pastries as well as cookies and brownies, and it sells bakery items online as well.  The interior of the bakery is cute as can be; it’s decorated with red, white and blue and houses its own dog tag engraver.

So, next time you’re traveling somewhere, look up allergy friendly bakeries.  You never know what you might find!

Link

Necessary Medicine, Unnecessary Price Spike

Prices of Epi-Pens have more than quadrupled over the past few years.  The devices, which are one of only available treatments for food allergy reactions on the US market, are now costing hundreds of dollars.  As a result, I now have only one set of Epi-Pens, compared to the two or three sets that I used to distribute between my house, the school nurse, and my backpack.  For less privileged people, it can be difficult to even purchase one set with the price surge.  On top of that, the Epi-Pens have a shelf life of eighteen months, but Epi-Pens that are new to the shelves are elusive, so food allergic people have to purchase new ones closer to every twelve months… and bear the elevated Epi-Pen price annually.

The price raise has recently been getting tons of media attention, with even Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton speaking about the issue.  Public health experts and legislators alike worry about the accessibility of epinephrine for food allergic Americans.  Thousands of Americans are speaking out against the price surge too by signing this petition.  It is hugely important that food allergic people can afford epinephrine and that they should never be forced to use self made syringes, expired Epi-Pens, or even to go without epinephrine, so please take a moment to fill out the petition to protect food allergic people!

Aside

Five Stars for Food Allergy Camp

A few days ago I had a wonderful opportunity to volunteer at a local camp for kids with food allergies.  The camp was called Camp ROAR (Really Outstanding Allergy Retreat) and participating kids were divided into three different age groups called Lions, Tigers, and Bears.  Every morning for one week, the kids had discussions about food allergies, played sports, and did crafts.  Kids brought their Epi Pens and other medications as well as a snack free of their allergens, and before and after snack the kids were asked to wash their hands so as to keep other campers safe.

When the group who organized the camp, PAK (Parents of Allergic Kids), asked me to volunteer, I was thrilled (even though I was only able to make it to one day of the camp).  Throughout the morning I spent at the camp, I was so excited to see the kids being able to meet and talk to other kids with food allergies.  When I was younger, food allergy camps were uncommon, if not nonexistent.  In fact, I did not meet any kids with severe food allergies like mine until I went to FARE’s Teen Summit for the first time a few years ago.

It was nice to know that the campers would be able to experience summer camp without some of the usual dilemmas like having to have a different snack from everyone else or not being able to participate in an activity because it involves their allergens.  I loved seeing them have meaningful conversations about food allergies.  They were willing to share their stories at such a young age without being embarrassed or feeling different or weird.  Camp ROAR really is really outstanding!

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